Intersectionality in Equal Pay

-2018/2019-

Vision

To eliminate inequality based on an individual's demographics or background

Aim

Our project seeks to contribute to the overall vision by raising awareness of, and educating people about the concept and importance of intersectionality. We are starting with an examination of how intersectionality impacts pay in the workplace.

Intersectionality is the interconnected nature of demographic factors such as gender, ethnicity, disability and age, which create overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage. It is distinct from approaches which only consider the impact of one demographic aspect (e.g., how gender alone impacts pay).

Evidence

The evidence on workplace pay shows that a double (or multiple) disadvantage exists for groups that are members of more than one minority demographic, e.g., women of colour are paid less than white women, who are all paid less than white men. Despite this knowledge, governments in the UK and globally tend to examine pay from either a gender or ethnicity gap perspective, rather than a combined (or even better, fully intersectional) approach, which limits its effectiveness and credibility.

Collaboration

The evidence on workplace pay shows that a double (or multiple) disadvantage exists for groups that are members of more than one minority demographic, e.g., women of colour are paid less than white women, who are all paid less than white men. Despite this knowledge, governments in the UK and globally tend to examine pay from either a gender or ethnicity gap perspective, rather than a combined (or even better, fully intersectional) approach, which limits its effectiveness and credibility.

Method

The evidence on workplace pay shows that a double (or multiple) disadvantage exists for groups that are members of more than one minority demographic, e.g., women of colour are paid less than white women, who are all paid less than white men. Despite this knowledge, governments in the UK and globally tend to examine pay from either a gender or ethnicity gap perspective, rather than a combined (or even better, fully intersectional) approach, which limits its effectiveness and credibility.

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Letters of Support
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